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20130117
20130125
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
he is going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. and johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't because i'm going to keep on talking. [inaudible] >> pardon? at any rate, a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movements and people in congress tried to put an end, finally for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmonton's bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenant started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge, with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpacks -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. excuse me. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of the sheriff's deputies, the straight troopers, trampling
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to doffs notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legitimate tors. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine except everybod
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
is the first african-american elected. he used language interesting to me. that we owe a lot to our founding documents. he referred a lot to the founding documents, not a lot to the founding documents. the founding fathers owned slaves. >> a process ever since. let's play a little bit about what he said. i think the constant looking back to the constitution was a very strong theme in his speech yesterday. let's play that. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are creating equal. that they are endowed by their creator with certainly unalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. >> and with that, he sort of launched into not an olive branch, he launched into here is the preparation for the fight ahead for the next four years. is that how you saw it? >> i saw it almost a campaign speech for 2014. we need congress, need to get this thing done, yeah. i saw it that way. and very interesting. the republicans and democrats are both in this death embrace. they each have their own constituents, throwing a lot of money at them on both sides. rep
dynamics on the hill. a republican house that was elected within their districts by large margins and president who won an election. how do we bridge the gap? how do we actually get the deal done. >> we have a system that is incremental in nature. we're not a parliamentary system where, if you control the government, you can move very quickly and aggressively. i have always said that the american politics is played on the 40-yard line. and both sides feel very strongly about their philosophical position. but there is a deep identity of interest that i think needs -- leads to premature should lead to agreement. if you're the president of united states, there are two events that you know may occur in the next four years, which could totally derail your capacity to do the of the things you want to do about the nation, your positive agenda. the first is the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction. i think this president has been dedicated to intelligence gathering and his use of various capabilities to reduce that threat. and secondly, the issue of the financial crisis driven by the
should be done. but you have probably more than any group of elected officials thought about this issue more intently and longer. you have done a great deal of work on this. all of you who deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands, but if i did, a lot of people would put their hands up in this room. how many of you mayors attended the funeral of a police officer or an innocent child in a drive-by shooting or shop owner in your city? many of you, many of you have had to attend and many of you, many, many funerals. some of your communities experienced mass shootings, not just in schools, but movie theaters and temples and not unique to big cities. it was -- i happened to be literally, probably turned out to be a quarter of a mile back in 2006 at an outing when i heard gunshots in the woods that we didn't know where we thought there were hunters. i got back to the clubhouse in this outing and saw helicopters. it was a shooting that had just taken place in a small amish school just outside of lancaster, pennsylvania. so it's not just big cities or well-to-do su
was elected president and called and said congratulations for your pulitzer in history. i would love to talk to you about how to preserve historical materials and what you've noticed from the presidential libraries you for tin. and on that basis we have talked a good bit while he's been president to renew our acquaintance ship after a 20 year hiatus. c-span: have you had any discussions with him about his whole race initiative? >> guest: absolutely. yes, i have. c-span: what do you recommend to him? >> guest: i think this is a great thing. i personally think from the work that i've done that our racial dialogue in america, our discourse is far behind hour objective reality and where we are; that if you study this period and you see how parochial, how limited, how much violence, how on a custom a lot of white people were even meeting simply from a different denomination or a different section of the country, there's -- ads in the newspaper were divided not only by race, but by sex; "help wanted, female," and jobs were -- you know, for women, were secretaries and teachers. we left it up a whol
. for example, jim messina, in charge of the obama re-election campaign puts out a letter, among other things, saying take a look at the president's plan to reduce gun violence and stand with him in support. wayne lapierre executive vice president of the nra issues a fundraising letter saying this. i warned you this day was coming and now it's here. it's not about protecting your children. it's not about stopping crime. it's about banning your guns period. so what are we seeing here? a real political campaign. >> on the one side you have the grassroots organization that the obama for america team use. now, they can't coordinate with the white house, wolf, on this, but they are using all of their apparatus to get out their grass root supporters because what they are trying to do is mobilize voters in much the same way that the nra has done over the years, which is make people who are for some kind of gun regulation, single issue voters and come out and pressure members of congress who may be wavering in gun states and say to them, you know, we want something done. on the o
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)